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31.07.2018
Miha Ahronovitz
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I like Om Legendary Om Malik, the founder of Gigaom had many ups and downs in his career. But he is a star player in Silicon Valley, no matter what. Like Messi or Ronaldo in soccer, but he  plays a superb game whether winning or losing. "Back in the day, when Silicon Valley was about silicon and technology, our industry elders used to wisely caution that Silicon Valley doesn’t invest in tobacco, alcohol, porn, and guns. Not anymore it seems." He concludes "Statutory warnings on these products should be a start. But I am all in favor of authorities coming down hard on them." Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup This is a book written by John Carreyrou, a Wall Street Journal investigative reporter  It is saga of Elizabeth Anne Holmes who started at 19 a blood monitoring company with best intentions in the world, to make the patients safer. She cited the fact that an estimated one hundred thousand Americans died each year from adverse drug reactions. Theranos the company Elizabeth founded - would eliminate all those deaths, she said. It would quite literally save lives. The good intention was a  lie "She worshipped Jobs and Apple. She liked to call Theranos’s blood-testing system “the iPod of health care” and predicted that, like Apple’s ubiquitous products, it would someday be in every household in the country." This is the Silicon Valley I dreamt of. Blue Blood  "On her father’s side, she was descended from Charles Louis Fleischmann, a Hungarian immigrant who founded a thriving business known as the Fleischmann Yeast Company. Its remarkable success turned the Fleischmanns into one of the wealthiest families in America at the turn of the twentieth century." Charles Louis Fleischmann was not only Hungarian, he was of Jewish descent, although it seems he was not a practicing Jew. Smoking cigarettes while reading the Talmud This story is from a book called "The complete Idiot's Guide to Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism" by Michael Levin A yeshiva student comes home on Sabbath afternoon and finds his father reading the Talmud and smoking a cigarette. He is shocked: smoking is forbidden on the Sabbath. The father noticed his son is stunned by his behavior. He said: "When you know as much Talmud as I do, you too can smoke a cigarette on Sabbath" People may become self-righteous for keeping their obligations like studying the Torah and feel the rules don't apply to them. They lost the fear of God and their humility. There is no spirituality and no kindness Arrogance is a kingdom without a crown These are words to describe Silicon Valley evolution These are actual quotes from the book “The biggest problem of all was the dysfunctional corporate culture in which the mini Lab was being developed. Elizabeth and Sunny regarded anyone who raised a concern or an objection as a cynic and a naysayer.” “For the dozens of Indians Theranos employed, the fear of being fired was more than just the dread of losing a paycheck. Most were on H-1B visas and dependent on their continued employment at the company to remain in the country. With a despotic boss like Sunny holding their fates in his hands, it was akin to indentured servitude. Sunny, in fact, had the master-servant mentality common among an older generation of Indian businessmen. Employees were his minions. He expected them to be at his disposal at all hours of the day or night and on weekends. He checked the security logs every morning to see when they badged in and out. Every evening, around seven thirty, he made a fly-by of the engineering department to make sure people were still at their desks working.” Fake-it-until-you-make-it "By positioning Theranos as a tech company in the heart of the Valley, Holmes channeled this fake-it-until-you-make-it culture, and she went to extreme lengths to hide the fakery. Many companies in Silicon Valley make their employees sign nondisclosure agreements, but at Theranos the obsession with secrecy reached a whole different level. Employees were prohibited from putting “Theranos” on their LinkedIn profiles. Instead, they were told to write that they worked for a “private biotechnology company.” Some former employees received cease-and-desist letters from Theranos lawyers for posting descriptions of their jobs at the company that were deemed too detailed." With a board of directors including Henry Kissinger, 94 years old, with top venture capitalists on board, with her original Stanford chemistry professor Channing Robertson, receiving a 500,000 dollars check for just being a cover up consultant, General Jim  Mattis who became Trump Defense Secretary, few is any contested Elisabeth legitimacy Elizabeth was a drop-out of Stanford with some hypnotic presence. How come she fascinated most famous people on the Valley, but fall under the influence of her boyfriend Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani? He was twenty years older and a married man when they first met. "Sunny was a force of nature, and not in a good way. Though only about five foot five and portly, he made up for his diminutive stature with an aggressive, in-your-face management style. His thick eyebrows and almond-shaped eyes, set above a mouth that drooped at the edges and a square chin, projected an air of menace. He was haughty and demeaning toward employees, barking orders and dressing people down." Just read the book for the details and no one ask a question. Murdoch invests by gut feeling, he never does due diligence Sunny Balwani and Elizabeth Anne Holmes How could that happen? I asked myself this question whether this was autogenerated by Silicon Valley itself, by the culture of Unicorn or by the deterioration of Stanford University clout  accepting success at any price? Epilogue - for now If you read the LinkedIn as I do, 99% of the people are not entrepreneurs. They just pretend being entrepreneurial when all they want is a job. So let’s assume although Elizabeth is proven guilty, she gets funded again. Would you refuse to work for her? No!  You wouldn’t, despite what happened to Theranos. You will take the job again with both hands and pray this time is Kosher.  And Bad Blood will become a cult book, just like Paul Coelho “The Alchemist” and Steve Jobs biography by Walter Isaacson and the words Fake-until-you-make-it  will enter the Bible. See recent article Theranos' Elizabeth Holmes and 'Sunny' Balwani are indicted and accused of fraud schemes June 15, 2018 from Los Angeles Times
21.06.2018
Miha Ahronovitz
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Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, who passed away in 1810 has written a hassidic story called The Rooster Prince. In this story, a prince goes insane and believes that he is a rooster (or turkey.) He takes off his clothes, sits naked under the table, and pecks at his food on the floor. The king and queen are horrified that the heir to the throne is acting this way. They call in various sages and healers to try and convince the prince to act human again, but to no avail. Then a new wise man comes to the palace and claims he can cure the prince. He takes off his clothes and sits naked under the table with him, claiming to be a rooster, too. Gradually the prince comes to accept him as a friend. The sage then tells the prince that a rooster can wear clothes, eat at the table, etc. The Rooster Prince accepts this idea and, step-by-step, begins to act normally, until he is completely cured. There are many interpretations to this story My suggestion is to name the kings heir, Kim ( Kim Jong Un). We call the wise man who takes off his clothes Donald (Donald Trump, the 45th US President) Donald, left and Kim, right
03.05.2018
Miha Ahronovitz
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Cloud In a 2015 article on Medium, Cloud was defined still using the NIST (The National Institute of Standards and Technology) cloud definition expanded over the years to two pages. This is most accurate, long, academic, monotonous, boring definition of cloud computing.  Cloud Factories This academic definition has been challenged by Jason Hoffman, the Ericsson's cloud guru at that time. Over the past decade Web-based services like Google, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft have stopped buying finished computers, storage devices and network components and instead developed their own systems in-house to create massive, low-cost data centers in the cloud to serve billions of users. Jason Hoffman He called them cloud factories, because CIO’s are thinking today (2015) how to begin to modernize the end-to-end IT infrastructure, so it can be a cloud factory. Also there are some 2015 slides  with the main points I extracted. The Internet of Things (IoT) for business This is a  white paper from Aeris compiled by  Syed Zaeem Hosain, CTO The explosion of IoT, envisaged to reach 20 billion by 2020, requires a new look at the cloud “The cloud” has been coined to describe the systems that allow processing and storage of information and data in extremely large data centers for a fee. This has transferred the need for entities and corporations to maintain their own physical hardware, data centers, and data networks, etc., to the cloud providers. This eliminates traditional operational burdens of physical site maintenance, electrical power management, environmental conditioning, and system redundancy. " The fee charges can be high for large-scale applications and large numbers of device deployments.  Fog Computing Fog Computing Diagram (see reference) In general, the process in a cloud is  a general is a “transmit everything and process in the cloud” implementation.  However, if actions based on the data must be processed in real-time or near-real-time, it may be better to process or filter the data remotely—at the device, or elsewhere hierarchically in the data flow before it gets to the remote storage. This remote processing and filtering has been termed “fog computing” by Cisco. The diagram is self-explanatory Cisco White Paper Fog Computing and the Internet of Things: Extend the Cloud to Where the Things Area originated the modern  term of Fog Computing. Edge Computing and Fog Computing Cisco baptized the name Fog. but really in my opinion, this is the same as Edge Computing In a recent interview Jason Hoffman, now CEO MobiledgeX answered the question "Where and what the edge computing is for you?  "For some reason, there is almost an over obsession of where and what their edge computing is right." In terms of Fog definition, wherever there is a need to (1)  pre-process the data remotely, or  (2) some data are processing and used in real time  we have an edge. Fog computing then manages the cloud and its' multiple edges, no matter where they are located. Pros and cons for Fog Computing This is from IBM Telecom operated as Cloud and Edge Computing This is for example the 13 countries operated by Deutsche Telekom today The goal is to replace the legacy technologies in individual European countries with more centralized cloud systems catering to the entire region. In this way, Deutsche Telekom AG (NYSE: DT) hopes to collapse about 650 different service platforms into just 50. Instead of developing a new service 13 different times for 13 different countries, it would in future build and manage one service for all its operations. They do not exist yet The Edge and the Cloud universal platforms do not exist yet, but must be in produccion  Most IoT advertising cloud functionality offer a lock-in that works for their products only. Jason Hoffman has the idea of an IoT universal platform. He reminds us how Amazon Web Services started with a developer payment API, then to an API called messaging cue system and then a three API called optic store and then you know a compute service that was really just batch compute on the object store. The documentation for the whole thing was a couple of pages.
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